Reaney Days

Reaney Days

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Canal Event


The St. Johnsville Chamber of Commerce will host a canal celebration on Saturday, October 14 from 11AM-2PM at the St. Johnsville Marina. 

The event will include a pig roast to benefit OESJ Class of 2019, children’s games, pumpkin painting, “Junk in the Trunk” mobile garage sales, ribbon cutting for the new marina laundry and bathhouse and a display of old canal photos.  Music for the event will be provided by Linda Lee and the Fox Creek Band. 

Chamber members and St. Johnsville Town and Village residents and businesses are invited to participate with Junk in the Trunk at no charge.  There will be a nominal set-up fee of $5 for anyone else.  For planning purposes, sign-up for Junk in the Trunk is required. In addition, village residents wishing to have an at-home garage sale are advised that the usual village permit fee has been waived for that day. 
 
Anyone wishing to sign-up for “Junk in the Trunk”, secure pre-sale pig roast tickets or needing additional information is invited to contact event chair Crystal Napier at 315-527-9585 or via email at stjspringfest@yahoo.com

 

Writer to Read


Margaret Reaney Memorial Library will host writer Christine Oarr Eggleston at the St. Johnsville Community House, Thursday, October 19 at 7 PM.

Eggleston, a former area journalist and retired Amsterdam teacher, will be reading from her series of Murder in the Mohawk Valley tales.

Of particular interest to local residents will be the 1916 Rotundi murder at the old Rapacz Market and the 1889 stabbing death of young Floyd Nellis in the Lion Knitting Mill.

Eggleston began writing in 1972 for the Amsterdam Recorder and worked as a journalist for two decades before becoming a teacher.

Now retired, she has returned to her first career. She graduated from Fulton Montgomery Community college where she received the Evans Award in English, SUNY Oneonta with a degree in Human Ecology and also holds a master's degree in Educational Psychology.

Her two previous published works were for children, "The Boy Who Slept in the Pickle Barrel, an Erie Canal Tale"  and "Valerie Celery" a book about bullying.

The Community House is located at 16 Washington Street, St. Johnsville.  Anyone desiring further information is invited to contact library director Dawn Lamphere at 518-568-7822. 
 
 

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Nifty Needles

Nifty Needles will convene at Margaret Reaney Memorial Library on Wednesday, September 27.



The group, which is open to anyone who enjoys handicrafts, will meet at 10 a.m. Thereafter, Nifty Needles will meet the second and fourth Wednesday of each month.

 For more information, call Library Director Dawn Lamphere at 518-568-7822. 
 
 

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Family StoryTime


           

            Family Storytime will begin Friday, October 6 at 10 AM.  The program is open to children infant to age 4.  

            Finger plays, nursery rhymes, songs and stories will be shared in addition to time set aside for play.  The program is intended to introduce children and their adult care givers to the library and reading. 

Family Storytime is free, however, for planning purposes please contact the library if you are interested in attending.  The library is located at 19 Kingsbury Avenue, St. Johnsville and may be reached at 518-568-7822. 
 
 

 

Monday, September 11, 2017

September 11

Over the years as library director I have been invited to speak at a number of public occasions. One of the most profound occurred in 2011 on the 10th anniversary marking September 11. My remarks preceded a baseball game at Soldiers and Sailors Park. My dad always said that one of the worst things as a nation we could do would be to forget the great sacrifices made in the name of freedom. As you go about the business of living remember those people who gave so much on that September day. Whatever your belief system, there but for the grace of God, goes anyone of us.
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As you look out under the canopy of this glorious September day, a day much like ten years ago, you see our future as a nation resting squarely on the slim shoulders of these young boys; some of whom are far too young to have felt the impact of that particular fall day.
It is these boys, as well as all the children across this great nation, with their enthusiasm and excitement that have given us reason, even during the darkest of days, to keep pressing forward.
Whenever we are faced with cataclysmic events that define and shape us as individuals, and collectively as a society, we have no trouble at all recalling where we were and what we were doing when those events unfolded.
On this grim day a decade ago we see in our minds eyes, through the haze of an entire nation’s mourning, the images which have forever become engraved in our hearts. We often wonder how much we can possibly bear, how great a burden can we carry? The sacrifice and suffering of September 11th demonstrated to us that while we as a nation may bend, we remain unbroken.
As clear as if it were yesterday we recall the determined faces of emergency personnel and first responders and the haunted look of broken families and a devastated citizenry. Within the stillness of our minds and hearts we hear the focused words of our leaders and the comforting prayers of our pastors.
We need to remember, never forgetting that day, and all that has occurred at home and abroad because of September 11. The twin flames of hope and remembrance light our path towards the future as we continue to struggle to find a new kind of normal.
On what is probably one of the saddest anniversaries our country marks we need to keep hope alive because it is when our despair extinguishes that flame of hope our enemies claim victory.
On this day remember and pledge yourselves to never forgetting. On this same day play ball and laugh and hold your loved ones close because if there is one thing September 11, 2001 taught us it is this; how quickly things can change, almost in the twinkling of an eye.
Soldiers and Sailors Park
St. Johnsville, NY
September 11, 2011

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Alzheimer's Series


Margaret Reaney Memorial Library, in cooperation with the Alzheimer’s Association, will host the three-part series, Living with Alzheimer’s for Middle-Stage Caregivers, consecutive Tuesdays beginning September 26.

In the middle stage of Alzheimer’s disease, those who were care partners now become hands-on caregivers.   Over the course of the three presentations participants will hear caregivers and professionals discuss helpful strategies to provide safe, effective and comfortable care in the middle stage of Alzheimer’s. 

The series will take place September 26, October 3 and 10 from 1P-230P at the Reaney Library. 

For planning purposes please register with the library at 518-568-7822.

Margaret Reaney Memorial Library is located at 19 Kingsbury Avenue, St. Johnsville.   
 
 

Thursday, August 24, 2017

Sharing the Eclipse


A favorite phrase among politicians of late is “shared services”.  Public libraries have a long standing tradition of just that and nowhere was it more evident than during the August 21, Great American Eclipse.   

While many libraries across the nation received official eclipse glasses, the Margaret Reaney Library was not among them.  In an email conversation with several of my colleagues throughout the Mohawk Valley and Southern Adirondack Library Systems, a generous offer to share came from the Middleburgh Library in Schoharie County.  With a few strokes of the keyboard, the Reaney Library suddenly found itself in possession of one hundred and fifty pair. 

I immediately posted our good fortune to Facebook and soon the phone began ringing, FB messages started arriving, and people were coming through the door to collect a pair.  In no time at all one hundred and fifty pair were spoken for.  The sharing, however, did not stop there.

One pair of glasses went to a family and were shared by eight children and four adults spanning four generations.  Another person reported that she had taken hers when running errands and, after 5 stops, the glasses had been shared by twenty-two people.  Two pair of glasses found themselves on either end of Main Street where they were shared by shop owners and passersby.

A couple of pairs were circulated among boaters and campers at the St. Johnsville Marina and Campsite.   On Mount Hadley, a single pair was shared among a group of hikers and, at Glimmerglass State Park, two pair made the rounds of those on the beach. 

A young man, coming out of Stewart’s, was invited to take a peek by residents at  Midtown Estates. A patron shared her pair with thirty co-workers and a gentleman stopping in at Performance Therapy and Fitness watched his glasses repeatedly go out the door.

Our glasses also found their way to Oneida and Saratoga Counties.  Standing on the quad at Mohawk Valley Community College a patron pulled out her official eclipse glasses and was soon asked where she had secured a pair.  She proudly answered, “the St.Johnsville Library” and proceeded to share them with the group around her. 

Like mushrooms in the rain, our eclipse experience here at Margaret Reaney Library just kept growing and growing and growing.  It was positively wonderful and a whole bunch of fun.  We are eagerly looking forward to the spring of 2024.