Reaney Days

Reaney Days

Saturday, June 25, 2016

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Memorial Day Speech

Soldiers and Sailors Park
St. Johnsville
May 30, 2016


Today, out of all days, we need to put aside our disagreements and strife, and take time to remember those who are too often out of sight, but never out of our hearts and minds. 

 Today, as a community and nation, we share a great common sorrow as we publically honor the best and noblest of us all. Memorial Day is a day of conflicting emotions for each of us; a blend of pride and mournfulness, gratitude and loss, overshadowed by a deep and profound sense of patriotism.   

Memorial Day is the day for all Americans as one body, to stand up and say “We remember you.”

Certainly every loss of life is tragic, especially when it is a life prematurely ended in the heat of combat.  May the memory of our collective sons and daughters be cherished and their sacrifices noted and appreciated by the country they so bravely protected.    

Today, we also honor those families of the fallen who are joined together and bound by a loss in ways most of us can’t even imagine more less understand.  Bereaved parents often become isolated after a tragic loss.  Friends don’t know what to say about a grief no words can touch.  There isn’t a word for a parent who has lost a child; Webster’s or the Oxford dictionaries can’t define it.  What we can do is remember their loss and the best way to thank these families is to honor their fallen, just as we are doing this morning. 
 

Americans, as we know, can be forgetful of the sacrifices made by military members, veterans and their families.  Beyond the many citations for valor are the untold, undocumented stories of men and women who live with the scars of war.  As we maintain the memory and deeds of our fallen, we also need to remember to care for those who have returned home from their service.  Many Americans are coming home with amputations, disfigurements, physical illness due to environmental exposures, traumatic brain injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder.  They have stood up for each and every one of us here today.  They have stood for us, when we couldn’t or wouldn’t stand for ourselves.   It is now up to us, as a grateful nation, to stand with them in the face of politics and power, to see that their wounds; the wounds of mind, body and spirit are healed, and in so doing, health and hope are restored.   

 President Thomas Jefferson wrote and I quote “the price of freedom is eternal vigilance”. End quote.  To that end, never forget, never let your children forget, how fortunate we are to have a voluntary force of men and women willing to safeguard our freedom so we can rest soundly at night.  

What happens long after the yellow ribbons fade to white, the last note is blown for Taps, and the flag waving has died down?  Does our obligation to remember end there?   Absolutely not.  Our honored dead and veterans deserve better.  The defenders of this nation fulfilled their duty and obligation to us, and we have an equal duty to honor and fulfill our obligations to them.  To do anything less is a betrayal.  Let our every deed and act be guided by the memory of those who gave their lives for our freedom.  May their sacrifice continue to inspire us and strengthen our resolve.   

As their loyal countrymen, we pledge to never abandon their memory or allow them to slip from our national conscience.  Your attendance here today stands as a testimony of a grateful public.  

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. said “In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.” End quote.   On this day, of all days, that silence is deafening.  As we leave this place, listen to those now silent voices of the fallen, who across the generations, call out to us from beyond the grave.  Listen to their silence not with your ears, but rather with your hearts.  Listen to their silence and remember.   

God bless us all, and may God continue to bless these United States.

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Memorial Day



Library trustees Rebecca Sokol and Sharon Fuller, along with groundskeeper Patrick Smith, have taken some time to clean up around the Reaney family stone, do some planting and fill an urn in anticipation of Memorial Day. 
Trustee Sokol suggested it would be nice to recognize and honor Mr. and Mrs. Reaney in light of their many contributions to the community.  


Saturday, May 21, 2016

Zoli.....Zoli.....Zoli

I had a wonderful time as a Community Reader for the OESJ Elementary School PARP program this past Thursday. I got to see many familiar faces, a couple of neighbors, and make some new pals.
 The children were well behaved and enthusiastic. They were a credit to their teachers; Mrs. Mang, Mrs. Heroth, Mrs. Case and Mrs. VanValkenburgh, and their parents.
In keeping with the program's medieval theme, the vestibule, halls and classrooms were colorfully decorated with castles, knights, dragons and princesses.
It would also be remiss if I did not comment on how attractive the front entrance is landscaped. I have pink, plastic flamingos on my lawn, so when I see something so nicely done I tend to notice!
PS....if anyone came home singing "zoli, zoli, zoli......." Blame it on me.

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Flapjacks and Fairytales 2016


Margaret Reaney Memorial Library Board of Trustees is pleased to announce their annual fundraiser, Flapjacks and Fairytales, has been scheduled for Sunday, September 18, at the HC Smith Benefit Club. 

The event will include a basket raffle and plentiful pancake breakfast. 

A planning meeting for those interested in helping in the kitchen and dining room has been scheduled for Monday, May 23, 6:30 PM at the library.  If anyone would like to help but is unable to make the meeting, please call the library at 518 568 7822. 
 
 

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

In the Merry Month of May


We had such lovely turn outs for last night’s Color Me Calm gathering and today’s In Search of Faith book discussion.  Please, check your calendars and plan to join us for these upcoming May events!

Nifty Needles will meet Friday, May 6 & 20.  Needle workers of any kind are welcome to gather around the table from 10 AM – noon.

Peanut Butter and Jelly book club will meet Saturday, May 14 at 10 AM to discuss the Anita Shreve novel, Light on Snow.

On Saturday, May 21 at 10 AM the Reaney Writers will meet at the American Legion Rooms, 38 W. Main Street.  The group is facilitated by local writer Ali MacDonald.

Color Me Calm with Conversation, an adult coloring group, will meet at Bridge Street Bakery and Café on Tuesday, May 24 at 6 PM.

On Wednesday, May 25 the In Search of Faith book club will meet at 10 AM to discuss Phil Robertson’s autobiography Happy, Happy, Happy; My Life and Legacy as the Duck Commander.

Anyone desiring further information is invited to contact Dawn Lamphere at 518-568-7822.

     

Tuesday, April 5, 2016

April is National Poetry Month


April marks the 20th anniversary of National Poetry Month.  It has been my experience that poetry sometimes gets a bad reputation.  What does it mean? How do you read it?  Even after I’ve read it, I don’t always understand the deep, profound meaning. 

My response to all of that is that perhaps you need to start simple and work up to those poems with “deep and profound meaning”.  

To that end, let me introduce you to the absolutely hysterical, laugh out loud funny, children’s poet Jack Prelutsky. Prelutsky was named the first Children’s Poetry Laureate by the Poetry Foundation in 2006.  Inventive and fun, his writing is wildly popular. 

I share with you his delightful poem, The Turkey Shot out of the Oven.

Read, enjoy and set your poetry fears aside. 

 

The Turkey Shot Out Of The Oven   

The turkey shot out of the oven

and rocketed into the air,

it knocked every plate off the table

and partly demolished a chair.  
 

It ricocheted into a corner

and burst with a deafening boom,

then splattered all over the kitchen,

completely obscuring the room.   
 

It stuck to the walls and the windows,

it totally coated the floor,

there was turkey attached to the ceiling,

where there'd never been turkey before. 
 

It blanketed every appliance,

it smeared every saucer and bowl,

there wasn't a way I could stop it,

that turkey was out of control. 
 

I scraped and I scrubbed with displeasure,

and thought with chagrin as I mopped,

that I'd never again stuff a turkey

with popcorn that hadn't been popped. 

 

Jack Prelutsky